Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923)

Kathleen Mansfield Murry (14 October 1888 – 9 January 1923) was a prominent New Zealand modernist short story writer who was born and brought up in colonial New Zealand and wrote under the pen name of Katherine Mansfield. At 19, Mansfield left New Zealand and settled in the United Kingdom, where she became a friend of modernist writers such as D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf. In 1917 she was diagnosed with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, which led to her death at the age of 34.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Teresa de la Parra (1889-1936)

Teresa de la Parra (October 5, 1889 – April 23, 1936) was a Venezuelan novelist.

She rebelled against the limited expectations for women of her class by long hours of reading and writing. Her fantastic stories were published in the newspaper El Universal, and her Diary of a Caraqueña in the Far East was published in the magazine Actualidades.

De la Parra’s novel Iphigenia: Diary of a young lady who wrote because she was bored, published in 1924, marked a change in Venezuelan literature. Teresa de la Parra wrote most of the novel in 1921 and 1922 during the dictatorship of Juan Vicente Gómez. Some of the characters in the novel were maliciously close to caricatures of people who were then well known in Caracas society. The characters Abuelita, Tía Clara and César Leal represent strict adherence to morality. Ambitious and politically corrupt characters like Gabriel Olmedo and Tío Pancho also reflect moral freedom given to men, in contrast against the passive role assigned to women.

The protagonist of Iphigenia, María Eugenia Alonso, a well-educated and intelligent young woman, is partly a self-portrait of the author. María Eugenia struggles against being confined in a marriage that threatens to stifle her intellectual development. She strives to determine whether it is possible for an intelligent and educated woman to evade marriage without losing her respectability in a society where women are expected to become wives and mothers.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Gabriela Mistral (1889-1957)

Gabriela Mistral (7 April 1889 – 10 January 1957) was the pseudonym of Lucila Godoy y Alcayaga, a Chilean poet-diplomat, educator and humanist. In 1945 she became the first Latin American author to receive a Nobel Prize in Literature, “for her lyric poetry which, inspired by powerful emotions, has made her name a symbol of the idealistic aspirations of the entire Latin American world”. Some central themes in her poems are nature, betrayal, love, a mother’s love, sorrow and recovery, travel, and Latin American identity as formed from a mixture of Native American and European influences. Her portrait also appears on the 5,000 Chilean peso bank note.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Dorothy Parker (1893-1967)

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) was an American poet, short story writer, critic, and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.

From a conflicted and unhappy childhood, Parker rose to acclaim, both for her literary output in publications such as The New Yorker and as a founding member of the Algonquin Round Table. Following the breakup of the circle, Parker traveled to Hollywood to pursue screenwriting. Her successes there, including two Academy Award nominations, were curtailed when her involvement in left-wing politics led to a place on the Hollywood blacklist.

Dismissive of her own talents, she deplored her reputation as a “wisecracker.” Nevertheless, her literary output and reputation for sharp wit have endured.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Anaïs Nin (1903-1977)

Anaïs Nin (February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an essayist and memoirist born to Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba, but lived most of her life in the United States, where she became an established author. She wrote journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), novels, critical studies, essays, short stories, and erotica. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds, was published posthumously.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Simone de Beauvoir (1908-1986)

Simone de Beauvoir  (9 January 1908 – 14 April 1986) was a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. Though she did not consider herself a philosopher, she had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory.

De Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, autobiography and monographs on philosophy, politics and social issues. She was known for her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women’s oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism; and for her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins. She was also known for her lifelong open relationship with French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979)

Elizabeth Bishop (February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979) was an American poet and short-story writer. She was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 1949 to 1950, the Pulitzer Prize winner for Poetry in 1956, the National Book Award winner in 1970, and the recipient of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 1976.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Carson McCullers (1917-1967)

Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, and poet. Her first novel, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, explores the spiritual isolation of misfits and outcasts in a small town of the U.S. South. Her other novels have similar themes and most are set in the deep South.

McCullers’ oeuvre is often described as Southern Gothic and indicative of her southern roots. However, McCullers penned all of her work after leaving the South, and critics also describe her writing and eccentric characters as universal in scope. Her stories have been adapted to stage and film. A stagework of her novel The Member of the Wedding (1946), which captures a young girl’s feelings at her brother’s wedding, made a successful Broadway run in 1950–51.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Iris Murdoch (1919-1999)

Dame Jean Iris Murdoch (15 July 1919 – 8 February 1999) was an Anglo-Irish novelist and philosopher, best known for her novels about good and evil, sexual relationships, morality, and the power of the unconscious. Her first published novel, Under the Net, was selected in 1998 as one of Modern Library’s 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. In 1987, she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire.  In 2008, The Times ranked Murdoch twelfth on a list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Hilda Hilst (1930-2004)

Hilda de Almeida Prado Hilst (April 21, 1930 – February 4, 2004), more widely known as Hilda Hilst, was a Brazilian poet, playwright, and novelist, whose fiction and poetry often drew upon themes of delicate intimacy, whilst also addressing the topic of insanity and incorporating supernatural events. Several of her late works include elements of magic realism.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Gloria Steinem (1934-)

Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist, journalist, and social and political activist, who became nationally recognized as a leader and a spokeswoman for the feminist movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Steinem was a columnist for New York magazine, and a co-founder of Ms. magazine. In 1969, Steinem published an article, “After Black Power, Women’s Liberation”, which brought her to national fame as a feminist leader.

Gloria Steinem speaking with supporters at the Women Together Arizona Summit at Carpenters Local Union in Phoenix, Arizona, September 2016.

In 2005, Steinem, Jane Fonda, and Robin Morgan co-founded the Women’s Media Center, an organization that works “to make women visible and powerful in the media”.

Steinem currently travels internationally as an organizer and lecturer, and is a media spokeswoman on issues of equality.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Betty Rollin (1936-)

Betty Rollin (born January 3, 1936 in New York City), has been an NBC News correspondent and author.

Rollin’s reports have won both the DuPont and Emmy awards. She now contributes reports for PBS’s Religion and Ethics News Weekly.

Rollin is a graduate of Fieldston Ethical Culture School and Sarah Lawrence College where she was a classmate of Yoko Ono as Ono mentioned on the Dick Cavett Show.

Rollin was first diagnosed with breast cancer in 1975, and again in 1984, each time losing a breast to the disease. Rollin discussed her cancer publicly and wrote about it cancer in the book, First, You Cry. to encourage public awareness and to give encouragement to others facing this disease. First, You Cry was made into a television movie starring Mary Tyler Moore as Rollin.

Rollin’s mother Ida was diagnosed with terminal ovarian cancer in 1981, and Rollin helped her mother end her life in 1983. She revealed this in her book Last Wish, published in 1985 and republished in 1998. One critic called it “a document of personal compassion and public importance.” The book has been published in 19 countries and was made into a TV movie in 1992 starring Patty Duke as Rollin and Maureen Stapleton as her mother.

Since the book was published, Rollin has been active in the Death with Dignity movement. She is now on the Advisory Board of Compassion and Choices.

She and her husband, mathematician Dr. Harold Edwards, live in Manhattan. They have no children.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Ana Cristina César (1952-1983)

Ana Cristina César (June 2, 1952 – October 29, 1983) was a poet and translator from Rio de Janeiro. She came from a middle-class Protestant background and was usually known as “Ana C.” She had written since childhood and developed a strong interest in English literature. She spent some time in England in 1968 and, on returning to Brazil, she became a published author of note. The 1970s and early 1980s were the peak of her poetic career.

She returned to England in 1983. One of the authors she admired was Sylvia Plath. She shared some commonalities with her in temperament and fate. She died in 1983 by jumping out of a window at her parents´ apartment, in Rio de Janeiro.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Eve Ensler (1953-)

Eve Ensler (born May 25, 1953) is an American playwright, performer, feminist, and activist, best known for her play The Vagina Monologues. In 2006 Charles Isherwood of the New York Times called The Vagina Monologues “probably the most important piece of political theater of the last decade.”

In 2011, Ensler was awarded the Isabelle Stevenson Award at the 65th Tony Awards, which recognizes an individual from the theater community who has made a substantial contribution of volunteered time and effort on behalf of humanitarian, social service, or charitable organizations.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Lionel Shriver (1957-)

Lionel Shriver (born May 18, 1957) is an American journalist and author who resides in the United Kingdom. She is best known for her novel We Need to Talk About Kevin, which won the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2005 and was adapted into the 2011 film of the same name, starring Tilda Swinton.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Arundhati Roy (1961-)

Suzanna Arundhati Roy (born 24 November 1961) is an Indian author. She is best known for her novel The God of Small Things (1997), which won the Man Booker Prize for Fiction in 1997. This novel became the biggest-selling book by a nonexpatriate Indian author. She is also a political activist involved in human rights and environmental causes.

Source: Wikipedia

 

Ann Patchett (1963-)

Ann Patchett (born December 2, 1963) is an American author. She received the 2002 PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize for Fiction in the same year, for her novel Bel CantoPatchett’s other novels include The Patron Saint of Liars (1992), Taft (1994), The Magician’s Assistant (1997), Run (2007), State of Wonder (2011), and Commonwealth (2016).

Source: Wikipedia

 

Elizabeth Gilbert (1969-)

Elizabeth M. Gilbert (born July 18, 1969) is an American author, essayist, short story writer, biographer, novelist, and memoirist. She is best known for her 2006 memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, which as of December 2010 had spent 199 weeks on the The New York Times Best Seller list, and which was also made into a film by the same name in 2010.

Source: Wikipedia